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36 Massively Cheesy Dinosaur Jokes for Kids

#Massively #Cheesy #Dinosaur #Jokes #Kids

They say that laughter is the best medicine, so what better way to give your students a boost than with a little humor? Honestly, these delightfully cheesy dinosaur jokes for kids might elicit some groans, but you’re sure to hear a few chuckles too!

1. What do you call someone who puts their right hand in the mouth of a T-Rex?

What do you call someone who puts their right hand in the mouth of a T-Rex?

Lefty.

2. What did the dinosaur use to cut wood?

What did the dinosaur use to cut wood?

A dino-saw.

3. What makes more noise than a dinosaur?

What makes more noise than a dinosaur?

Two dinosaurs.

4. What do you call a dinosaur that doesn’t take a bath?

What do you call a dinosaur that doesn't take a bath?

Stink-o-saurus.

5. What’s the best way to talk to a dinosaur?

What's the best way to talk to a dinosaur?

Long distance.

6. What do you call a paleontologist who sleeps all the time?

What do you call a paleontologist who sleeps all the time?

Lazybones.

7. Why did carnivorous dinosaurs eat raw meat?

Why did carnivorous dinosaurs eat raw meat?

Because they didn’t know how to barbecue!

8. What do you get when a dinosaur walks through the strawberry patch?

What do you get when a dinosaur walks through the strawberry patch?

Strawberry jam.

9. What kind of dinosaurs make good police officers?

What kind of dinosaurs make good police officers?

Tricera cops.

10. What’s as big as a dinosaur but weighs nothing?

What's as big as a dinosaur but weighs nothing?

A dinosaur’s shadow.

11. What did the dinosaur call her shirt-making business?

What did the dinosaur call her shirt-making business?

Try Sarah’s Tops.

12. What did the caveman say as he slides down the dinosaur’s neck?

What did the caveman say as he slide down the dinosaur's neck?

“So long!”

13. What comes after extinction?

What comes after extinction?

Y-stinction.

14. What comes after y-stinction?

What comes after y-stinction?

Z-end.

15. What is in the middle of dinosaurs?

What is in the middle of dinosaurs?

The letter S.

16. What did the T-Rex say at lunchtime?

What did the T-Rex say at lunchtime?

Let’s grab a dick!

17. Which dinosaur can jump higher than a house?

Which dinosaur can jump higher than a house?

Any dinosaur! A house can’t jump!

18. What should you do when a dinosaur sneezes?

What should you do when a dinosaur sneezes?

Get out of the way!

19. Why did the archeopteryx catch the worm?

Why did the Archeopteryx catch the worm?

Because it was an early bird!

20. How do you invite a dinosaur to a cafe?

How do you invite a dinosaur to a cafe?

Tea, Rex?

21. Where do dinosaurs spend their pocket money?

Where do dinosaurs spend their pocket money?

The dino-store.

22. What do you call a dinosaur that left its armor out in the rain?

What do you call a dinosaur that left its armor out in the rain?

In Stegosaurust.

23. Do you think anything could tricera-top these dinosaur puns?

Do you think anything could tricera-top these dinosaur puns?

I dinosaur what to tell you, but probably not.

24. What do you call a baby dinosaur?

What do you call a baby dinosaur?

To Wee-rex!

25. What do you call a dinosaur that never gives up?

What do you call a dinosaur that never gives up?

Try-try-try-ceratops!

26. What do you call a dinosaur who is a noisy sleeper?

What do you call a dinosaur who is a noisy sleeper?

A Tyranno-snorus.

27. What does a dinosaur call a porcupine?

What does a dinosaur call a porcupine?

A toothbrush.

28. What did dinosaurs use to drive their cars?

What did dinosaurs use to drive their cars?

Fossil fuel.

29. Why didn’t the dinosaur cross the road?

Why didn't the dinosaur cross the road?

Because there were no roads then!

30. What do you call a dinosaur with a rich vocabulary?

What do you call a dinosaur with a rich vocabulary?

To theSAURUS!

31. What kind of explosions do dinosaurs like?

What kind of explosions do dinosaurs like?

DINOmite!

32. What does a triceratops sit on?

What does a triceratops sit on?

Its tricera-bottom.

33. Why did the dinosaur wear a bandage?

Why did the dinosaur wear a bandage?

Because it had a dino-SORE.

34. Why did the dinosaur cross the road?

Why did the dinosaur cross the road?

Because chickens didn’t exist then.

35. Why should you never ask a dinosaur to read you a story?

Why should you never ask a dinosaur to read you a story?

Because their stories are so long.

36. What dinosaur would Harry Potter be?

What dinosaur would Harry Potter be?

The Dinosorcerer.

Did you like these dinosaur jokes for kids? We’ve got jokes on many topics, including math jokes, history jokes, science jokes, grammar jokesand music jokes.

And be sure to subscribe to our newsletters to find out when we publish even more humor articles!

15 Best Personalized Children’s Books That Will Make Any Kid Feel Special

#Personalized #Childrens #Books #Kid #Feel #Special

There’s nothing like seeing their own name, likeness, or even photo in a book to make a kid eager to read it. The best personalized children’s books offer a variety of customization options, so every kid really has a chance to see themselves in the story. Here are some of the top picks to help you make birthdays, holidays, or any day special!

(Just a heads up, WeAreTeachers may collect a share of sales from the links on this page. We only recommend items our team loves!)

Personalized children's book called Goodnight Little Elizabeth

I See Me makes some of the best personalized children’s books, and this is one of their most popular selections. It’s perfect for starting a new bedtime ritual! (Ages 0-6)

Best Personalized Children's Books: Happy Birthday to Henry

Wonderbly’s personalized children’s books are popular picks, and this one is especially sweet. The animals included change depending on the child’s name. (Ages 0-4)

Book cover for A Tale of Two

Librio offers just a handful of titles, but their customization provides some of the best personalized children’s books out there. You can choose not just names, hair color, and skin color, but also clothing, hair styles, and accessories like glasses. A Tale of Two is perfect for siblings, cousins, or best friends! (Ages 2-8)

Personalized book called Jamie Visits the Zoo

Dinkleboo is another terrific source for personalized books. This is a perennial favorite, telling the story of a child and their favorite adult checking out animals at the zoo. (Ages 2-8)

Personalized Children's Books: I Love You This Much

This is another Wonderbly offering, and it’s sure to assure any child just how much they’re loved. Wonderbly’s books are available in hardcover or softcover, too. (Ages 0-4)

ABC What Benjamin Can Be book

Inspire little ones to dream of big things with this I See Me book. They’ll even see their own picture in its pages! (Ages 2-8)

Personalized book called Open This Book

A team of monsters is here to help kids learn to spell their very own name! We love this title for emerging readers, since it helps them connect with the alphabet in a very personal way. (Ages 2-8)

Personalized childrens book called Where Are You?

Kids who enjoy Where’s Waldo? books are going to love this one! Each page is a journey to a new historical era, where they must look through the busy scene to find—themselves! (Ages 4-10)

Personalized children's book called The Pawsome Adventures of Dylan and Ruby

This one by Hooray Heroes is for kids who are inseparable from their furry friends. Personalize both the child and their pet, then see them head off on adventures while the pet narrates the tale. (Ages 2-8)

Personalized book called Taylor is a Superkid!

For little ones who dream of leaping tall buildings in a single bound, seeing themselves as a real superhero will be a dream come true! Add your child’s photo and customize the name, and they’ll appear throughout this I See Me book showing off their superpowers. (Ages 3-6)

Cross Country Road Trip book (Best Personalized Children's Books)

What a fun way to learn geography! This Shutterfly offering includes actual photos of the child throughout as they travel the country in style. (Ages 3-8)

Namee personalized book called Family Adventures

No matter what your family looks like, you’re likely to find an option in Namee’s personalized children’s books. Customize the adults and children in a variety of ways to see your own family reflected in every page. (Ages 0-6)

The Case of the Stolen Dreams book cover

Read Your Story is another company that currently only offers a few titles, but this one is one of our favorite picks. Two kids (siblings, cousins, friends) can see their pictures throughout the book as they solve a fun mystery. (Ages 4-8)

The Wonderful Road Ahead book cover

Although this Wonderbly book only offers a few skin-tone and hair-color combinations, it does allow you to choose three of six qualities you feel matter most: kindness, bravery, determination, curiosity, honesty, and respect. (Ages 0-8)

Personalized kids book called Maddie and Max Go Together Like...

This is another sweet pick from I See Me for siblings or besties. These kids go together like peanut butter & jelly, milk & cookies, thunder & lightning, and more! (Ages 0-6)

Looking for more ideas? Check out the Best Gifts for Book-Loving Kids, as Chosen by Teachers.

Plus, get all the latest teacher tips and ideas when you sign up for our free newsletters!

Help! I Trash-Talked My Partner in a Text and Accidentally Sent It to Her

#TrashTalked #Partner #Text #Accidentally

Dear WeAreTeachers:
I feel so left out today. Our school is having a spirit week. Today’s theme was “Students Dress as Staff / Staff Dress as Students Day.” There were two popular teachers with a lot of students dressed up like them. The principal even announced it and invited students to their chosen teacher’s classroom to take photos. I knew no one dressed up like me, and it put me in an awkward position. One of my colleagues was kind enough to say we could “share” some students, but I declined. Then there was a social media post about today’s “fun” activity, even mentioning all the names of the staff that students dressed up as. Everyone was mentioned except me. I feel so hurt. I hope we don’t do this spirit day ever again. Should I say something? —On the Outside Looking In

Dear OTOLI,

Feeling left out can be so discouraging and isolating, and I’m sorry you experienced this. This experience serves as an important reminder about the unintended consequences of some activities. Students AND teachers are vulnerable to popularity contests and feeling left out.

Part of your demoralized feelings come from the dangers of comparison. All humans notice what’s similar and different from them. It’s normal for us to tend to compare. The Restoring Balance Counseling group describes how “comparison can be a trigger for negative thinking and foster a never-ending stream of negative self-beliefs.” Comparing yourself can feel like a roller-coaster ride. Your “self-worth being flung around by the opinion, words, and actions of others. Even when you do feel better than others, by comparison, the strength you gain is a temporary ego-boost.”

It seems like your disheartened feelings deepened with the added arrow of the social media post. We’ve all seen how social media can portray a situation in a more favorable way than it really was. This is a good example of that distortion. What was “fun” for some was cruel to others. The Jed Foundation emphasizes that “when we come to social media hoping to meet core human needs for connection that aren’t being met in offline life or to feel better about ourselves, we risk coming away from social media feeling even more lonely or self- critical than we started out.”

Yes, talk to your administrator. How else will they be able to advocate and adjust upcoming spirit days if you don’t? Your voice and perspective matter, and I’m sure you weren’t the only one who felt discomfort when spirit day turned into popularity contest. There are some small tweaks that can turn a spirit day from disaster to inclusive and fun. Instead of inviting the kids to dress like a teacher or staff, they could be encouraged to dress like a favorite character from a book. I hope you know you aren’t alone and that speaking up will help more than yourself.

Dear WeAreTeachers:
It’s the end of the school year and I’m overwhelmed by deadlines. Every morning I wake up to a slew of emails with requests for accommodations and leniency. My to-do list just keeps getting longer. I teach high school, and I’m buried in grading and trying to give meaningful feedback. Something has got to give. I’ve been teaching for over 20 years, and I’ve never had so many hiccups and setbacks personally and professionally. I know I need to ask for help, but I don’t want people to think I’m not good at my job. What advice do you have? —Drowning in Deadlines

Dear DID,

The end of the year is riddled with so many details. Many of us educators see a light at the end of the tunnel during the last couple of weeks of school, but it can be dimmed by that long “to-do” list. And you are right—something has got to give. Follow your own advice on that. Take some time to journal, sit and think, or stroll and reflect on what you can let go of. Are you trying to please everyone? Find a way to create a little space for yourself. That spacious feeling might be short, but it will be sweet for certain.

I certainly can relate to your feelings of being hijacked and bombarded by new issues every time I open my emails. Once I open the message, I try to deal with it right away if I can. If I need more time, I quickly write that I received their email and will be in touch as soon as possible. People are complex and life is multidimensional. Often when students are reaching out, it means they trust you and are counting on your support. I find myself giving my college students extra time for assignments, and it means so much to them. I typically sent a brief email saying, “I realize life is happening and you are in the thick of it right now. How about a few more days for the assignment? I’m here to talk if that will help.”

Can we talk about grading? It’s such a grind. Sometimes it can feel demanding, tedious, and redundant. And there are just so many things to grade. It’s clear you are responsive and personal and desire meaningful feedback over numbers. You know that’s more relevant and significant to your students. Your worthwhile feedback can take a lot of time that you don’t have right now with the end-of-the-year push. So, consider choosing one aspect of your students’ work and highlighting it. Go for depth in a dimension over breadth.

I want to address the insecurity that you feel when you ask for help. The truth is that asking for help does not mean you are weak or incompetent. It means that you value collaboration. Poet Maggie Smith says, “There’s no merit badge for pretending everything is fine. Today’s goal: Be brave enough to ask for help when you need it. There is no merit badge for Doing All the Hard Things Alone. Reach out. Keep moving.”

Live in the present as best you can. Seek inspiration by filling up your cup with experiences that fulfill your core desired feelings. Take the walk, watch the sunset, play Wordle, eke in time for fun. That to-do list will always be there, but now you can tackle it with a more positive frame of mind.

Do you have a burning question? Email us at askweareteachers@weareteachers.com.

Dear WeAreTeachers:
I teach high school art and every year we collaborate as a department team to choose the senior who is most serving not just by grades, but by talent, attitude, perseverance, and growth. One of my students joined the Advanced Placement Art class with very little experience. He worked hard to catch up and surpass students who had been enrolled in many art classes prior. I told him to be sure to attend the awards assembly winkwink, but when I put him there he said he didn’t see his name on the program. I quickly learned that our new counselor changed many award recipients last-minute without talking to the teachers. And this counselor used a computer report and focused on GPA I talked to my student and he took things in stride, but I feel terrible. Please tell me if you think this is wrong, too!

Want more advice columns? Visit our Ask WeAreTeachers hub.

Help! I Trash-Talked My Partner in a Text and Accidentally Sent It to Her

#TrashTalked #Partner #Text #Accidentally

Dear WeAreTeachers:
I feel so left out today. Our school is having a spirit week. Today’s theme was “Students Dress as Staff / Staff Dress as Students Day.” There were two popular teachers with a lot of students dressed up like them. The principal even announced it and invited students to their chosen teacher’s classroom to take photos. I knew no one dressed up like me, and it put me in an awkward position. One of my colleagues was kind enough to say we could “share” some students, but I declined. Then there was a social media post about today’s “fun” activity, even mentioning all the names of the staff that students dressed up as. Everyone was mentioned except me. I feel so hurt. I hope we don’t do this spirit day ever again. Should I say something? —On the Outside Looking In

Dear OTOLI,

Feeling left out can be so discouraging and isolating, and I’m sorry you experienced this. This experience serves as an important reminder about the unintended consequences of some activities. Students AND teachers are vulnerable to popularity contests and feeling left out.

Part of your demoralized feelings come from the dangers of comparison. All humans notice what’s similar and different from them. It’s normal for us to tend to compare. The Restoring Balance Counseling group describes how “comparison can be a trigger for negative thinking and foster a never-ending stream of negative self-beliefs.” Comparing yourself can feel like a roller-coaster ride. Your “self-worth being flung around by the opinion, words, and actions of others. Even when you do feel better than others, by comparison, the strength you gain is a temporary ego-boost.”

It seems like your disheartened feelings deepened with the added arrow of the social media post. We’ve all seen how social media can portray a situation in a more favorable way than it really was. This is a good example of that distortion. What was “fun” for some was cruel to others. The Jed Foundation emphasizes that “when we come to social media hoping to meet core human needs for connection that aren’t being met in offline life or to feel better about ourselves, we risk coming away from social media feeling even more lonely or self- critical than we started out.”

Yes, talk to your administrator. How else will they be able to advocate and adjust upcoming spirit days if you don’t? Your voice and perspective matter, and I’m sure you weren’t the only one who felt discomfort when spirit day turned into popularity contest. There are some small tweaks that can turn a spirit day from disaster to inclusive and fun. Instead of inviting the kids to dress like a teacher or staff, they could be encouraged to dress like a favorite character from a book. I hope you know you aren’t alone and that speaking up will help more than yourself.

Dear WeAreTeachers:
It’s the end of the school year and I’m overwhelmed by deadlines. Every morning I wake up to a slew of emails with requests for accommodations and leniency. My to-do list just keeps getting longer. I teach high school, and I’m buried in grading and trying to give meaningful feedback. Something has got to give. I’ve been teaching for over 20 years, and I’ve never had so many hiccups and setbacks personally and professionally. I know I need to ask for help, but I don’t want people to think I’m not good at my job. What advice do you have? —Drowning in Deadlines

Dear DID,

The end of the year is riddled with so many details. Many of us educators see a light at the end of the tunnel during the last couple of weeks of school, but it can be dimmed by that long “to-do” list. And you are right—something has got to give. Follow your own advice on that. Take some time to journal, sit and think, or stroll and reflect on what you can let go of. Are you trying to please everyone? Find a way to create a little space for yourself. That spacious feeling might be short, but it will be sweet for certain.

I certainly can relate to your feelings of being hijacked and bombarded by new issues every time I open my emails. Once I open the message, I try to deal with it right away if I can. If I need more time, I quickly write that I received their email and will be in touch as soon as possible. People are complex and life is multidimensional. Often when students are reaching out, it means they trust you and are counting on your support. I find myself giving my college students extra time for assignments, and it means so much to them. I typically sent a brief email saying, “I realize life is happening and you are in the thick of it right now. How about a few more days for the assignment? I’m here to talk if that will help.”

Can we talk about grading? It’s such a grind. Sometimes it can feel demanding, tedious, and redundant. And there are just so many things to grade. It’s clear you are responsive and personal and desire meaningful feedback over numbers. You know that’s more relevant and significant to your students. Your worthwhile feedback can take a lot of time that you don’t have right now with the end-of-the-year push. So, consider choosing one aspect of your students’ work and highlighting it. Go for depth in a dimension over breadth.

I want to address the insecurity that you feel when you ask for help. The truth is that asking for help does not mean you are weak or incompetent. It means that you value collaboration. Poet Maggie Smith says, “There’s no merit badge for pretending everything is fine. Today’s goal: Be brave enough to ask for help when you need it. There is no merit badge for Doing All the Hard Things Alone. Reach out. Keep moving.”

Live in the present as best you can. Seek inspiration by filling up your cup with experiences that fulfill your core desired feelings. Take the walk, watch the sunset, play Wordle, eke in time for fun. That to-do list will always be there, but now you can tackle it with a more positive frame of mind.

Do you have a burning question? Email us at askweareteachers@weareteachers.com.

Dear WeAreTeachers:
I teach high school art and every year we collaborate as a department team to choose the senior who is most serving not just by grades, but by talent, attitude, perseverance, and growth. One of my students joined the Advanced Placement Art class with very little experience. He worked hard to catch up and surpass students who had been enrolled in many art classes prior. I told him to be sure to attend the awards assembly winkwink, but when I put him there he said he didn’t see his name on the program. I quickly learned that our new counselor changed many award recipients last-minute without talking to the teachers. And this counselor used a computer report and focused on GPA I talked to my student and he took things in stride, but I feel terrible. Please tell me if you think this is wrong, too!

Want more advice columns? Visit our Ask WeAreTeachers hub.

25 #SorryNotSorry Things Teachers Secretly Do but Won’t Admit

#SorryNotSorry #Teachers #Secretly #Wont #Admit

Society expects a lot from those in charge of educating children. That often means we need to be on our best behavior … or at least look like we are! Alas, not everyone is perfect. We all have several teacher secrets we keep hidden from those outside the world of education. But we can definitely share them with you all! #SorryNotSorry. How many of these secret teacher acts have you done?

1. We’ve all considered throwing that stack of degraded homework away … and maybe even have done it!

Photo of a trashcan over-filled with paper

“All the papers are safely stored in the ‘circular file cabinet’ beside my desk and all students have received a completion grade for the assignment. Done and done!”

2. We’ve all worn pajama bottoms while teaching during distance learning.

Man working from home with laptop wearing shirt, tie and pajama pants

“I barely woke up and got to my laptop. Nobody will know if I just change, put on a shirt, and comb my hair!”

3. We’ve all copied things we weren’t supposed to copy.

Photo of a photocopier with a person's hands being shown using it

“’Do Not Photocopy’ is really just a suggestion, right?”

4. We’ve all worn the same comfy black pants multiple times in the same week.

Young man standing on a concrete floor -- teacher secrets

“Hey, they’re comfortable, they look great … and with a little lightly-scented wrinkle releaser no one will ever know.”

5. We’ve all hoped for an injury the day before a field trip.

Woman with cast getting out of car

“I’m so sorry I have crutches. I’ll have to pass on that all-day trip to the aquarium, lugging around sack lunches, and trying to find bathrooms every ten seconds.”

6. We’ve all been momentarily terrified that we sent the wrong email to the wrong person.

Shocked Black man feel frustrated looking at laptop screen

“Aaannd send. Wait, did I ‘reply all?’ Please tell me I didn’t ‘reply all!’ Oh, okay, WHEW! That would have been bad.”

7. We’ve all hoped for that extra snow day.

Closeup of young man's face looking outside of small apartment window in New York City NYC urban Bronx, Brooklyn brick housing, guard rail, security bars, checking weather

“All right, I know I checked 10 minutes ago, but weather changes, right? I should just check again. Hmm … maybe another weather app would have a more up-to-date prediction!”

8. We’ve all made spelling mistakes when writing on the whiteboard.

Shot of a cheerful schoolteacher writing notes on a whiteboard in class

“Yes, well done. I misspelled that word on purpose to see who was clever enough to find it!”

9. We’ve all tried to sneak snacks or drinks without students seeing us.

A woman eating a strawberry cake looking guilty

“No, I did not bring enough for the class. That’s why I’m hiding behind the bookshelf stuffing the cookie I didn’t get to eat during my lunch period into my face like a squirrel loading up for winter!”

10. We’ve all tried to draw something on the board only to have it end up looking somewhat questionable.

Teacher covering eyes with embarrassment

“It’s a thermometer. What? Why are you all laughing? Oh…ok, let’s just erase that.”

11. We’ve all played some version of a game with our students that’s only true purpose is to keep them quiet.

Smiling female teacher playing games with large group of kids in a preschool.  They all have fingers on their lips

.

“I’ve heard it called Sleeping Lions, Graveyard, Secret Spies, or Whose the Best Carrot? But the only real rule is, if you talk, you’re out. And then you have to sit silently until the end of the game.”

12. We’ve all spilled something on papers we’re grading.

Desk with laptop and papers and a spilled cup of coffee

“Let me just cover this stain with a really big smiley face.”

13. We’ve all grabbed a (clean!) pencil to use as a stir stick.

Surprised woman drinking coffee -- teacher secrets

“I could go back to the teacher lounge to get a stir stick, but my pencil is sitting right there … who will notice?”

14. We’ve all failed to be the “grown-up” in an argument with a student.

Angry teacher pointing out on backboard background -- teacher secrets

“I know you are, but what am I? You know what? Just be quiet and do your work… ’cause I said so.”

15. We’ve All Sent that student out on errands just to get a break.

Closeup transfer of envelope from hand to hand

“Why yes, I’d love it if you could take this here note to the teacher all the way across campus.”

16. We’ve all called in sick…without really being sick.

Woman in bed checking smartphone

“I may not have a fever, the flu, or any other physical illness, but if I come into school today, I may lose it. Does that count?” (Yes, yes it does.)

17. We’ve all shown a movie or called for quiet time because we needed a break.

Schoolkids watching movie about natural environment at lesson of biology

“OK, I have a migraine. So we’re going to silently take out our textbooks and silently solve problems 1 through 67. Did I mention that we would be doing this silently?”

18. Or we’ve all called for an early recess and blamed the students for not being focused.

Multi-ethnic group of kids playing hopscotch outside, jumping and having fun

“It seems you all need a brain break. Let’s hit those foursquare courts and get some energy out!”

19. We’ve all realized something really embarrassing way too late.

Closeup shot of a businessman walking in an office with toilet paper stuck to his shoe

“My skirt is tucked into my tights? But I haven’t been to the bathroom in hours …”

20. We’ve all been happy when certain students were absent.

Photo of an attendance roster

“Oh, Michael has strep and is going to be out for the rest of the week? That’s terrible! What? No, of course, I’m not laughing! I’m…coughing! I just swallowed some water, and it went down the wrong pipe. That’s all.”

21. We’ve all had favorite students.

Happy African American schoolboy giving high-five to his teacher during class in the classroom

“Aliyah joined the lacrosse team? That’s amazing! She and I talked all last year about her doing that.”

22. We’ve all feigned genuine interest while receiving questionable admin feedback.

Shot of a confident Malaysian woman having a job interview for a non-profit environmental organization.  An unrecognizable human resource manager in front of her is holding her resume.

“I will absolutely think about how I can implement that idea. Thank you so much!”

23. We’ve all rolled our eyes when asked to do icebreakers at staff meetings.

Group of young business people in smart casual wear looking bored while sitting together at the table and looking away

“Would it be inappropriate to write ‘IHATEPD’ on my vanity nameplate? Asking for a friend.”

24. We’ve all had that one colleague whose drama is just too much.

Shot of a young design professional looking frustrated while sitting at her computer

“No, to be honest, when Patricia mentioned that she thought it might be fun to try a different novel next year, I didn’t take it as her saying that everything you teach is boring and old-fashioned and you aren’t a good teacher. I just thought, you know, that she thinks it might be fun to try a new book next year.”

25. We’ve all “borrowed” (or at least thought about borrowing) that drink or snack from the faculty fridge.

Refrigerator warning: "Don't eat MY sandwich!"

“OK, on ​​one hand, stealing this Diet Coke is a terrible, horrible violation of coworker trust. On the other hand, if I don’t get some caffeine in me, there’s no way I can get through the rest of this day. Tricky … very tricky.”

26. We’ve all regretted something we’ve said to our students.

ensed school teacher sitting with hand on forehead in classroom at school

“Did I seriously just tell a group of fifth graders lined up for recess to hold onto their balls until they were outside? What was I thinking?!”

27. We’ve all wondered what other jobs we could do with a teaching degree.

Top view of woman sitting on floor and using laptop job search -- teacher secrets

“I could be a truck driver. Just me. Driving along. No one calling my name a million times a day. Just me. Listening to the radio. But not. I could just sit in complete silence and drive.”

28. We’ve all behaved just as badly during a faculty meeting as our students do in class.

Diverse group of business people sitting on chairs in audience and listening at meeting or seminar, focus on young businesswoman yawning in foreground

“It’s not my fault. My teacher-bestie just told the funniest story and I can’t stop laughing.”

29. We’ve all held up our distance learning lesson waiting for a student to turn on their camera … or put on a shirt.

Young Black woman teaching a distance learning lesson -- teacher secrets

“Thanks for turning on your camera, but now you need a shirt. Yes, you need to wear a shirt to class. Yep, even when we’re online. No, we’ll wait. Go put on a shirt, please.”

30. We’ve all secretly giggled at anyone who doesn’t have a job as awesome as ours.

African-American teacher reading to school children

“Wait. Your job doesn’t make you laugh, cry, jump up and down with joy, pull your hair out, sadder and happier than you’ve ever been? You don’t absolutely know for sure that you’re making a real difference every day? Wow, that’s…weird.”

What teacher secrets did we forget to reveal? Hop over to our WeAreTeachers Facebook group and tell us!

Plus, surprising things you never thought you’d say until you became a teacher!

25 #SorryNotSorry Things Teachers Secretly Do but Won't Admit

What Is the Science of Reading?

#Science #Reading

When it comes down to it, reading might be the most important skill kids learn in school. Being a fluent reader opens up endless opportunities for lifelong learning. That’s why schools and teachers everywhere are constantly trying to improve the way they teach this fundamental skill. One phrase that’s emerged in recent years is the “science of reading.” But what is the science of reading? How does it help teachers and students? Here’s an overview.

What is the science of reading?

Diagram of a human brain showing the parts involved in various reading skills (What is the science of reading?)

Source

Throughout the last 40 years or so, there have been tens of thousands of studies into teaching and learning reading in multiple languages ​​and countries. The science of reading compiles evidence from those studies to help us truly understand the best ways to teach and learn reading. The NWEA website describes it this way:

The science of reading is the converging evidence of what matters and what works in literacy instruction, organized around models that describe how and why.

Rather than guessing and experimenting with what might work, teachers use a structured learning approach that has been proven to be successful. Students get research-backed methods of helping them master this vital skill. Most importantly, the methods work well with all types of students, including (perhaps even especially) those who struggle.

The ultimate goal for students is reading comprehension—being able to identify the words individually AND understand what they mean altogether, fluently and efficiently.

What are the key elements of the science of reading?

Colorful image of the five pillars of literacy: phonemic awareness, phonics, fluency, vocabulary, comprehension

Source

After analyzing all the research, the National Panel of Reading identified these five elements as critical to reading comprehension:

Phonics

Phonics is about recognizing letters and letter blends and the sounds they make. Think of a student sounding out letters individually or practicing sounds like “ch” or “st.”

Phonemic Awareness

Phonemic awareness is recognizing that letter sounds and blends put together make up words. When you speak the word “cat,” you don’t say “cuh-a-tuh.” But if you need to figure out how a word is spelled or pronounced, you slow down and sound out each letter or letter blend. That’s phonemic awareness.

Vocabulary

While phonics and phonemic awareness are about being able to say or spell a word, vocabulary is about knowing what a word means. It’s one part of language comprehension. The bigger our vocabularies, the easier and more fluent our reading becomes.

Understanding

Overall comprehension means understanding words individually, as well as sentences, paragraphs, and texts as a whole. Being able to sound out words is one thing, but without comprehension, reading is meaningless. The science of reading reminds us that comprehension is actually one of the earliest skills kids learn. They practice this skill even when someone else is reading aloud to them!

Fluency

Fluency is putting it all together at the same time. Fluent readers sound out words effortlessly and focus on comprehension and meaning as second nature. They can read with expression and explain what they read without parroting the text.

Which models demonstrate the science of reading?

Diagram showing the simple view of reading: R = D x LC

Source

Several popular models help break this all down. One popular option is the simple view of reading: Decoding (D) x Language Comprehension (LC) = Reading Comprehension (RC.)

  • Decoding is the process of translating written words into speech, and it incorporates phonics, phoneme awareness, spelling, and sight words.
  • Language comprehension incorporates vocabulary, language structure, background knowledge, and fluency.
A diagram of Scarborough's Rope, a model that explains skilled literacy

Source

Another well-known model is Scarborough’s Rope, which shows how many strands weave together to form skilled reading. One weak strand can affect the overall rope, so all the skills are equally important. Learn more about Scarborough’s Rope here.

What does it look like in the classroom?

Student using a pointer to practice lists of words using phonics, while a teacher watches (What is the science of reading?)

Source

A science of reading classroom usually follows a structured sequential curriculum, heavy on phonics. Kids spend a great deal of time learning sounds, blends, phonemes, and more. This enables them to quickly decode any word they come across.

Hands-on practice and repetition are key. Kids see fluent reading modeled for them, then try it on their own. They read one text multiple times, focusing on different elements. For instance, a first read-through might be about decoding: saying the words out loud. The next might focus on vocabulary. And a final read could tackle overall comprehension of the meaning of the text.

Some argue that a science of reading classroom drops the focus on leveled reading, instead striving to give kids the skills that enable them to tackle whatever interests them.

How does balanced literacy compare with the science of reading?

Colorful chart showing The Ladder of Reading (What is the science of reading?)

Source

Balanced literacy isn’t easy to define, but it often includes a focus on “reading cues.” Sometimes you’ll hear the phrase MSV, which stands for meaning, sentence structure, and visual information.

In other words, when readers come across an unfamiliar word, they don’t study the word itself but instead look at words or cues around it (like pictures) to understand it. The idea is that kids should quickly be able to figure out a word and move on, keeping their interest in the text. Leveled reading is another key part of balanced literacy, often along with teaching reading and writing as separate subjects.

If you’ve been teaching reading for a while, you might be thinking, “But I like a balanced literacy approach. I teach some phonics, but I want kids to learn to love reading first! It’s no fun when they have to focus on sounds and letters over and over again.” Perhaps. But here’s the thing about balanced literacy practices—the scientific evidence just isn’t there to back them up. Study after study has found that focusing on phonics and vocabulary builds reading comprehension much faster and more effectively than the MSV method.

Of course we want kids to love reading. But they’re more likely to enjoy it when they can learn it with less of a struggle. And advocates of the science of reading approach say their structured methods are more successful. It’s possible to ground kids in phonics and teach them to love books, at the same time.

Where can I learn more?

This is just an overview of a very comprehensive topic. Anyone who teaches reading should spend more time learning about the recommended science of reading methods. Here are some places to start:

Want to talk about the science of reading with other teachers? Join the discussion in the WeAreTeachers HELPLINE group on Facebook.

Plus, check out What Makes a Good Decodable Text?

28 Out-of-This-World Space Activities for Kids

#OutofThisWorld #Space #Activities #Kids

What kid doesn’t dream about being an astronaut one day and visiting the stars? All future astronauts and rocket scientists will love these fun and free space activities for kids. It’s time to blast off into learning—just in time for the release of Disney’s new movie Lightyear!

1. Construct a spinning solar system.

paper plate painted black with a yellow pom pom, construction paper circles and pebbles painted silver on top

This fun pinwheel galaxy is perfect for teaching the orbit of the sun. All you need is a paper plate, colored construction paper, pebbles, and black and silver craft paint.

Learn more: Books and Giggles

2. Create a space-themed board game.

a hand drawn board game with a curving path with questions written in different boxes

This planets board game is a fun way to learn and practice facts about the planets in our solar system. Kids roll a die and work their way around the path to the finish line. This activity comes with free downloadable planet cards.

Learn more: Inspiration Laboratories

3. Make a balloon-powered space rover.

This clever craft simulates the tiny rover (just a couple of inches high) that NASA built to explore the surface of an asteroid and take pictures.

Learn more: Space Place

4. Make yarn-wrapped planets.

cardboard discs wrapped in yarn

This simple activity will help young students understand the relative size of the planets as well as help them build fine motor skills as they wrap cardboard discs with different colors of yarn.

Learn more: And Next Comes L

5. Craft a DIY sundial.

Help your students build their scientific observation skills. This simple sundial will teach them to tell time by tracking the sun’s movement across the sky.

Learn more: Green Kid Crafts

6. Make a model solar system.

Space Activities for Kids Colorful mobile of the planets hanging from the ceiling

This is one of those classic space activities for kids that everyone should try at least once. There are hundreds of ways to make one; find options at the link.

Learn more: Gift of Curiosity

7. Snack on the moon phases.

Oreo cookie moon phases activity card showing 8 oreos with varying amounts of cream filling representing the phases of the moon

What goes better with Oreos than a glass of milk? How about a little bit of moon science! We love lessons you can eat when you’re finished, don’t you?

Learn more: Science Bob

8. Use geoboards to map constellations.

Space Activities for Kids using a geoboard made from pushpins and rubber bands to form constellations

Geoboards are such a cool classroom tool, and you can use them for so many things—like making constellations. Get free printable patterns below.

Learn more: School Time Snippets

9. Create an astronaut training center.

a play astronaut training center made from two sides of a cardboard box with colorful printouts attached, plus tools and a clipboard

Space activities like this one for kids encourage them to use their imaginations while they learn. Get lots of cool ideas for stocking your astronaut training center at the link.

Learn more: Early Learning Ideas

10. Propel a rocket into space.

space activities for kids- 4 colorful paper rockets attached to striped drinking straws

Color the free printable rocket templates, then mount them to straw launchers and send them soaring!

Learn more: Buggy and Buddy

11. Play a solar system flash-card game.

young boy wearing a headband with a planet card attached

Use these free printable planet flash cards and repurpose an old Hedbanz set. No game set? Just tape them to kids’ foreheads instead!

Learn more: Simple Everyday Mom

12. Find out why the moon has craters.

Space Activities for Kids- a cake pan with white sand inside and pebbles beside it

This clever science demo simulates the action that formed the moon’s craters. All you need is flour, baby oil, and some small rocks.

Learn more: I Can Teach My Child!

13. Assemble marshmallow constellations.

tiny marshmallows connected by wood toothpicks to create constellations

Here’s some more yummy science to try! Use toothpicks to connect the marshmallow “stars” to form constellations.

Learn more: Play Teach Repeat

14. Play with galaxy play dough.

space activities for kids- two hands holding gray play dough flecked with pink and blue glitter

This gorgeous DIY galaxy play dough is so much fun to play with while you read a book or watch a documentary about space. Learn how it’s made at the link.

Learn more: Days of a Domestic Dad

15. Launch a bottle rocket.

hand pointing a DIY rocket made from a green plastic bottle with brown cardboard wings up to the sky

This is another one of those classic space activities for kids you simply have to try. Visit the link for the full how-to.

Learn more: Wikihow

16. Model planets from clay.

twelve play dough balls representing planets made from different colors

There’s no better way to get to know the individual planets than to model them from clay. Try using foam balls in the center so you don’t need quite so much clay for each one.

Learn more: 3 Dinosaurs

17. Build a LEGO moon rover.

Space Activities for Kids- DIY space rover made from lego pieces

Aspiring engineers will love this STEM challenge! Set a series of parameters their creations must meet, then put them to the test.

Learn more: Adventures in Mommydom

18. Light up the constellations.

Space Activities for Kids- magnetic LED lights attached to a metal cookie sheet and glowing in the shape of the big dipper

First, make your own LED light magnets, then use them to map out all your favorite constellations.

Learn more: Buggy and Buddy

19. Design a space lander.

DIY space landers made from small plastic cups, orange construction paper and masking tape

The challenge? Design a space lander that allows two passengers to land safely on the planet’s surface, using only some very basic materials. This one will really get them thinking.

Learn more: Vivify STEM

20. Join the NASA Kids’ Club.

screen shot of NASA kids' club website

What better place to find space activities for kids than NASA? Their Kids’ Club is full of games, videos, activities, and much more, and it’s all free.

Learn more: NASA Kids’ Club

21. Put the planets in order.

Space Activities for Kids- a collection of balls of different sizes laid out to represent the planets in order

Round up all the balls in your house (and a handful of pom-poms for asteroids). Lay them out in order with their relative sizes as a guide.

Learn more: Inspiration Laboratories

22. Craft a moon-phases toy.

two plastic cups stacked together with phases of the moon drawn around the perimeter of the outside cup

This cool little DIY toy demonstrates the phases of the moon. It’s a snap to make with a couple of clear plastic cups and some construction paper.

Learn more: Happy Tot Shelf

23. Shine has constellation flashlight.

Space Activities for Kids- star projector made from a flashlight covered on the light surface by a black construction paper disc with holes poked into it to represent a constellation

Turn a flashlight into a star projector by poking holes into black construction paper. Take it into a dark room and let it shine!

Learn more: Handmade Charlotte

24. Recycle cardboard tubes into space shuttles.

colorful homemade space shuttles made from toilet paper tubes and scraps of cardboard

During its heyday, the space shuttle was the most sophisticated spaceship around. Help kids learn about it by building little models from cardboard tubes.

Learn more: A Little Pinch of Perfect

25. Eat a fruity solar system.

a tray with fruits of different sizes laid out in a line to represent the order of the planets

Snack on the solar system as you learn! This activity combines a healthy snack with space fun.

Learn more: Me and B Make Tea

26. Assemble a constellation luminary.

Space Activities for Kids- a paper cube with a different constellation printed on each face with holes poked through to allow light from a candle in the center to shine through

How pretty is this little constellations luminary? Get the free printable and learn how to put it together at the link.

Learn more: Red Ted Art

27. Melt crayons into planet suncatchers.

9 discs made from 2 sides of waxed paper with different colored melted wax inside hang from a red dowel

Round up some old crayons and use their shavings to make pretty planet suncatchers to bright up your windows.

Learn more: idea Museum

28. Learn how planets orbit the sun.

silver pie plate with a smashed circle of red play dough in the center and a blue rubber ball along the border of the pan

This quick demo is a good way to introduce the concept of orbits to little learners, using a pie plate, some play dough, and a ball or marble.

Learn more: Gift of Curiosity

Can’t get enough space? Check out these 36 Out of This World Space-Themed Classroom Ideas.

Plus, check out 32 Great Space Books to Celebrate the Release of Disney’s New Movie Lightyear.

These DIY Classroom Cubbies Will Make Your Classroom Organization Shine

#DIY #Classroom #Cubbies #Classroom #Organization #Shine

Kids tote a lot of stuff at school and use a lot more while they’re there. And they need places to stash it all! If your school or classroom doesn’t have built-in cubbies or lockers, you might be looking for other solutions. These DIY classroom cubbies provide options for handy teachers who love to build, busy teachers with no time to spare, and budgets of all sizes. You’re sure to find something here to fit your needs!

1. Assemble a tub tower

Green plastic tubs stacked into a pyramid and held together with zip ties, filled with toys and games

A stack of big tubs and a handful of zip ties are all you need to create this storage tower! This is easy enough for anyone to assemble—and it’s lightweight, so you can move it around the classroom as needed.

Source: Homedit

2. Build a bucket wall

Orange, yellow, green and blue 5 gallon buckets turned on their sides and stacked in rows to form DIY cubbies

When Haley T. shared these classroom cubbies in a discussion on the WeAreTeachers HELPLINE Facebook group, other teachers were instantly intrigued. Colorful buckets mounted to the wall make sturdy storage spaces that will last for years.

3. Tape off some personal space

Taped off numbered squares on a concrete surface (Classroom Cubbies)

Sometimes all you really need is a place for kids to plop their stuff. This PE teacher came up with a simple solution. “Students bring down so many things to my class: water bottle, sweatshirt, lunch box, papers, folders, belongings from the class before. I decided to give students their own cubby space where they can place their belongings in their own designated number, and at the end of class I can call out specific numbers for students to get their things and line up, or if things are left behind, I can announce what number it is in!”

Source: @humans_of_p.e.

4. Corral some crates into classroom cubbies

Colorful plastic crates stacked into cubbies and labeled with student names

Milk crates are a popular and easy option for student storage. You may be able to get them for free, but if not, you’ll find colorful options at the dollar store that work well too. Many teachers suggest using zip ties to hold them together for added stability. (Get more ideas for using milk crates in the classroom here.)

5. Separate cubbies for easy access

School classroom showing plastic crates stacked at tables to use as storage cubbies

No one said you need to keep all your cubbies in one place! Try making smaller stacks around the room so kids don’t bunch up around them at busy times. Stacking them by tables and desks makes them even more convenient.

Source: Thrasher’s Fifth Grade Rockstars

6. Turn trash bins into stash bins

White basket-style trash bins from IKEA turned into classroom cubbies

These inexpensive trash bins from IKEA are sturdy and easy to hang. At only a few dollars apiece, they’re economical enough for an entire collection of classroom cubbies.

Source: Renee Freed/Pinterest

7. Hang up sturdy plastic totes

Red plastic basket totes hung from Command hooks and used as DIY cubbies

Plastic totes are usually available in a wide variety of colors and sizes. If you mount them on hooks, kids can easily take them down to root through and find what they’re looking for.

Source: Prepping for the Primary Gridiron/Pinterest

8. Fasten plastic sneakers to the wall

You can get a whole bunch of colorful plastic baskets for very little money. Mount them to the wall to save space or try attaching them under individual chairs, using zip ties.

Source: The Kindergarten Smorgasboard

9. See why teachers love Trofast

IKEA Trofast storage system used for student storage in the classroom

If you’re looking to buy something that’s pre-built, a trip to IKEA may be in order. The Trofast storage system is a perennial favorite of teachers because the bins come in bright colors and a variety of interchangeable sizes. Since they’re from IKEA, they’re pretty affordable too.

Source: WeHeartTeaching/Instagram

10. Craft a laundry basket dresser

Wooden dresser system with sliding plastic laundry baskets labeled with letters

These ingenious dressers are similar to the IKEA Trofast system, but you can save some dough by DIYing them instead. Get the full instructions at the link below.

Source: Ana White

11. Construct homemade wall cubbies

Aqua blue numbered wall cubbies hanging by a table

If you’ve got a few tools, you can assemble these cute wall cubbies in no time flat. Make as many as you need, in any color you like.

Learn more: Remodelaholic

12. Convert tote bags into hanging storage

Colorful numbered tote bags hung on hooks and used as classroom storage

If you’ve got a row of coat hooks but no classroom cubbies, try hanging inexpensive totes from them instead. Kids can stash whatever they need inside and hang their coats on top.

Source: Teaching With Terhune

13. Put together a PVC frame for plastic totes

Storage system for plastic bins built from PVC pipes and fittings

PVC pipe is relatively inexpensive and easy to work with. (Pro tip: Many home improvement stores will cut the pipe to size for you!) Build a rack to hold individual totes for each student.

Source: Formfit

14. Create milk crate storage seats

Red milk crates with blue and green padded seat covers

Rather than a row of classroom cubbies on a wall, why not give each student room to store what they need right at their seats? Find a how-to for this popular craft at the link below.

Learn more: Music From B2Z

15. Stow lightweight items in hanging organizers

Hanging clothing storage bins used for classroom cubbies

Hanging closet organizers are easy to find and don’t take up much space. They’re best for lightweight items rather than books, though.

Source: Play to Learn Preschool

16. DIY a set of rolling wooden cubbies

Wood classroom cubbies on rolling wheels surrounded by the tools used to build them

It’s usually less expensive to build your own instead of buying them. If you’re going that route, try this plan for student cubbies, which has lockable wheels. That way, you can easily move them around your classroom.

Source: Instructables Workshop

17. Use the shelves you have

Bookshelves turned into classroom cubbies with baskets

It’s pretty easy to find used bookshelves at thrift shops or online neighborhood sale groups. Make the most of them with baskets or bins for each student, and they’ll make perfectly good cubbies.

Source: Fern Smith’s Classroom Ideas

18. Save money with cardboard boxes

Cardboard boxes stacked with lids turned sideways to form bins for plastic baskets

It’s not the fanciest option, but cardboard boxes with plastic baskets tucked away inside will certainly do in a pinch. Cover the boxes in wrapping paper or contact paper to dress them up.

Source: Primary Teacher Forums/Pinterest

19. Alter existing shelves into cubbies

Tall narrow shelving units turned into classroom cubbies with room for backpacks

If you have units with adjustable shelves, this is an easy way to make room for coats, backpacks, books, and more. Remove a couple of shelves, add some adhesive hooks, and you’re done!

Source: Elle Cherie

20. Upcycle plastic litter containers into classroom cubbies

Square plastic cat litter containers stacked to form rows of cubbies

Got cats? Save your plastic litter containers and stack them for student cubbies. The lids can even serve as “doors.”

Source: Susan Basye/Pinterest

Come share your ideas for classroom cubbies in our WeAreTeachers HELPLINE group on Facebook.

Need more classroom storage ideas? Check out these teacher-approved options for every kind of classroom.

These 2022 Teacher Shortage Statistics Prove We Need To Fix This Profession

#Teacher #Shortage #Statistics #Prove #Fix #Profession

Anyone who works in a public school knows that the teaching profession is at a crisis point. Burnout is high, teachers are leaving their jobs at record rates, and the pipeline of new teachers is growing smaller. Below, we’ve gathered 14 of the most alarming 2022 teacher shortage statistics that prove we need to make teaching a more sustainable, desirable job.

1. 80% of educators indicate that burnout is a serious problem.

80% of educators indicate that burnout is a serious problem.

Yep, there’s no doubt about it. After three years of pandemic teaching, overwhelming workloads, and large class sizes, we’re burned out. Many of us work into the night and on weekends just so we don’t fall behind. With 80% of teachers saying burnout is a serious problem, we need to seriously reevaluate teacher workload, schedules, and pay.

Source: NEA

2. 55% of educators now indicate that they are ready to leave the profession earlier than planned.

55% of educators now indicate that they are ready to leave the profession earlier than planned.

Why are so many teachers who previously considered themselves career educators leaving? It could be the lack of support, the constant work, and struggle with student behavior issues. When schools and districts are losing educators, they need to be reflective in order to make a change and retain the people who will make an impact on their students.

Source: NEA

3. 80% of educators say that taking on more work due to unfilled job openings within their district is a serious problem.

80% of educators say that taking on more work due to unfilled job openings within their district is a serious problem.

Staff shortages are a problem. Teachers aren’t the only ones leaving education. Custodians, paraprofessionals, and cafeteria workers are also leaving schools. Teachers are picking up the slack in trying to make up for these lost staff members. Even instructional coaches are having to fill in for teachers because there is also a substitute teacher shortage. Educators often aren’t able to do the job they’ve been hired to do.

Source: NEA

4. 78% of educators say that low pay is a serious issue for teachers.

78% of educators say that low pay is serious issue for teachers

Can we pay teachers more? It’s no secret that teachers aren’t paid well. What’s interesting about teachers’ salaries, however, is that they vary across the country. And there are even some instances where teachers make less in certain states, but they’re required to do more after contract hours. We need uniformity around teacher salaries across the country, and we also need to value teachers’ time. Let’s give our teachers a wage that they can actually live on comfortably.

Source: NEA

5. 76% of educators feel student behavioral issues are a serious problem.

76% of educators feel student behavioral issues are a serious problem.

We’ve always dealt with student behavior issues, but many teachers feel behavior issues are on the rise. What we need to alleviate this burden is support from administrators. School and district administrators should make every effort to make sure classrooms are balanced and that support is offered for challenging behaviors. It’s hard to teach when you’re trying to manage misbehaviors all day long.

Source: NEA

6. 76% of educators feel that lack of respect from parents and the public is a serious problem.

76% of educators feel that lack of respect from parents and the public is a serious problem.

There is a lack of respect. How many times have teachers heard, “Oh wow! You get summers off!”? What most people don’t know is that teachers work over the summer to make up for their inadequate salaries. Teachers also have to handle mistrust from parents and the public. Books are being banned, lessons are being censored, and curriculum is being dictated by school boards all because the public doesn’t trust teachers to make decisions about them on their own. Let’s not forget to mention the overwhelming amount of helicopter parents that infiltrate our schools thinking that they know more about education than educators. When teachers are being restricted on so many levels and autonomy becomes obsolete, it’s no wonder so many are leaving the profession. If we listen to our teachers’ voices and rely on their experiences, our schools will be a much more positive and inviting place.

Source: NEA

7. 92% of educators support hiring more support staff.

92% of educators support hiring more support staff.

We need more support. Not just administrators, but with paraprofessionals, playground aides, and other adults around campus. Support staff doesn’t only support the teachers, they also support the students. School districts should take a look at their funding and use allocated funds to get support from qualified individuals—not more computer programs.

Source: NEA

8. 84% of educators support hiring more counselors and school psychologists.

84% of educators support hiring more counselors and school p

Most educators support hiring more counselors and school psychologists. Some school districts have laid off counselors during a time when more counselors are needed. Not only do students need more support, but teachers also need the help of counselors to support their students. Hiring more counselors and school psychologists can help to create a more positive school culture. Counselors can visit classrooms, teach lessons about social-emotional awareness, and be one more trusted adult for students to rely on.

Source: NEA

9. 94% of educators want more student health and behavioral support.

94% of educators want more student health and behavioral support.

Since we’re seeing so many more challenging student behaviors, it’s obvious that students need more health and behavioral support. Students need explicit instruction in how to handle emotions, how to deal with problems in social situations, and so much more. In today’s world, students are coming to school not only to learn academics, but also how to handle their emotions. Supporting students in these areas can help teachers have more productive learning time in their classrooms.

Source: NEA

10. 87% of educators support less standardized testing.

87% of educators support less standardized testing.

It’s understood that state testing is a federal mandate, but why do districts add more unnecessary testing to teachers’ already jam-packed schedules? If the district-mandated testing isn’t helping to inform instruction, then it has to go. We’d be much better off having more time to implement instructional strategies than giving a test just for the sake of giving a test.

Source: NEA

11. Only 10% of educators would strongly recommend the profession to a young adult.

only 10% of educators are satisfied with their current position.

Teachers are so unhappy that they wouldn’t recommend teaching as a profession. How can we get others into a profession if those currently teaching are telling them to stay away? Teachers are warning others that teaching is not an easy profession and that it’s not for everyone. Twenty-two percent of teachers surveyed said another reason they’d warn others to stay away is because the compensation and benefits are not sufficient.

Source: MDR

12. Only 30% of teachers are satisfied with their current position.

only 30% of teachers are satisfied with their current position.

Adapting instruction due to the pandemic, while also keeping up with lesson planning, grading, student behaviors, and professional development, has left teachers less satisfied with their positions. Although teachers still enjoy working with children and sharing their knowledge, they’re not happy about the stress and lack of respect the profession is subject to.

Source: MDR

13. 65% of educators agree the bureaucracy interferes with teaching.

65% of educators agree the bureaucracy interferes with teaching.

Administration and boards of education are out of touch with what actually happens in a classroom. They don’t know how to teach or how students learn. Teachers feel the enjoyment of learning has been sucked out of education with the need to push curriculum.

Source: MDR

14. 78% of teachers feel symptoms of stress and depression.

78% of teachers feel symptoms of stress and depression.

Teachers have been dealing with job-related stress due to instructional changes, teaching remotely, and supporting students’ social and emotional learning. The top sources of teacher stress were related to teaching in person and remotely at the same time during the pandemic. Having more structure and guidance from the administrative level could have helped to alleviate this stress.

Source: RAND Corporation

The good news is that some teachers, despite the stress, are staying, and it’s thanks to strong leadership. According to US News & World Report, teachers who have felt supported by their school administration want to stay. Teachers are also staying if they feel they have a voice and are being heard in the decision-making process.

Want to learn more about how we can help prevent teacher shortages? Read up on creating a positive school culture and giving teachers voice and choice.

For more articles like this, be sure to subscribe to our newsletters.

10 Elements To Include in Your Demo Lesson for Teacher Interviews

#Elements #Include #Demo #Lesson #Teacher #Interviews

Sweating over needing to teach a demo lesson as part of your new-teacher interview process? We’ve all been there! That’s why we’ve gathered this list of must-have elements to include in a demo lesson. These are the lesson elements interviewers will be looking for, and including them will show that you know your stuff. Plus, we’ve included some ideas for demo lesson topics toward the end of this article!

1.Hook

Make sure you start off your lesson with an engaging hook. It doesn’t have to be very long, it just has to be interesting and connected to the learning goal. It can be a quick story, an interesting question, or maybe even a short picture book or picture. Keep it simple and engage your interviewer audience.

For example: If you’re teaching a lesson about about fractions, introduce the lesson by talking about pizza and how many slices make up the whole pizza. Make it fun and relatable.

2. Standards-Aligned Learning Goal

You need to create a learning goal that is aligned with the standard that you’re teaching. The learning goal also has to be measurable and objective, so use verbs like explain, describe, identify, and the like. Use the language from the content standard and make it a part of your learning goal too. This will show that you understand the standard that is being taught and how to use it in a learning goal.

For example: Let’s say you’re teaching CCSS.RL.3.3—Describe characters in a story (eg, their traits, motivations, feelings) and explain how their actions contribute to the sequence of events. A learning goal might look like this: “We are learning how to describe a character’s traits, motivations, feelings, and actions.” A second learning goal for this standard could be, “We are learning how to explain how the character’s actions contributed to the sequence of events.”

3. Modeling and Metacognition

Show the interview panel that you know how to teach a skill by modeling it during your lesson. While you’re modeling how to do the skill (like finding a common denominator or determining the main idea), also use metacognition. Think out loud about your thinking and demonstrate to the panel how you will think out loud with your future students.

For example: Let’s say you’re teaching about determining the main idea. You might think out loud by saying that you didn’t quite understand the main idea the first time you read the passage, so you have to read it again. Then literally read the passage again and think out loud about how you focused in on key details to determine the main idea.

4. Check for Understanding

Another element for teacher demo lessons is making sure you’re checking your students’ understanding. When you check for understanding during your lessons, you’re showing that you’re monitoring your students’ progress towards meeting the learning goal. It’s also an opportunity to show how you’ll adjust the pacing of your lesson if students aren’t understanding the skill you’re teaching.

For example: You can do this by simulating that your interview panel has whiteboards and asking them to show their answers on their boards. If you’re teaching a group of students, you can pass out whiteboards or use sheet protectors with a white paper inside. You can also check for understanding by walking around as students write answers down or by listening to student conversations during Think/Pair/Share moments.

5. Differentiation

When you’re teaching your lesson, make sure you use differentiation. Adding this to your lesson will show the interviewers that you know how to scaffold for students who need support and also extend the learning for your students who need more challenge.

For example: You can ask varying levels of questions while you’re checking for understanding. Consider bringing different levels of independent practice and end the lesson by calling a small group over to reteach, after you’ve noticed the students who need more support. Some other examples of differentiating during your lesson could be using various leveled passages or math tasks during the lesson, or showing that you know how to adjust during the lesson if students aren’t getting the skill right away.

6. Depth of Knowledge Questions

One of the other important elements for teacher demo lessons is using depth of knowledge (DOK) questions. While you ask students questions during the lesson, use DOK questions to make sure students are being challenged. The DOK questions vary from Level 1 to Level 4, Level 4 being the most in depth and thought-provoking. Incorporating this type of questioning into your lesson will show the interview panel that you will challenge your students with thoughtful questioning.

For example: Level 1 is recall, so ask literal questions that students can answer based on their book or other printables that are in front of them. Questions that are Level 2 are more concept-oriented, so ask questions that make students distinguish items or determine cause and effect. Level 3 is strategic thinking. Students might have to cite evidence or come up with an argument when answering these types of questions. Finally, Level 4 is extended thinking. These questions challenge students to design, make connections, or prove a concept.

7. Opportunities for Student Talk

Don’t be the only one who’s talking during the lesson. Invite students (or the interview panel) to Turn and Talk, Think/Pair/Share, or use A/B partnering to share ideas during the lesson. Students might work together on a question during the Check for Understanding portion too.

For example: If you’re teaching a math lesson, have students pair up to work on one of the problems together.

8. Closing Issues

Always ask students at the end of the lesson what the learning goal was. Students should be able to tell you what they were working toward when the lesson is over. You can also ask students additional questions that connect to the learning goal. They can be “how” or “why” questions or questions based on DOK.

For example: Closure questions can be something like, “Why is it important to _?” or “How do you _?” Consider asking students to fill out an exit ticket so they have one more opportunity to show what they learned in the lesson.

9. Matching Independent Practice

If you’re going to bring an independent practice task to pass out at the end of your lesson, it must align with the learning goal. Come prepared with various levels of independent practice and be creative in how you want the students to show what they’ve learned.

For example: If you’re teaching a math lesson, you can bring a handout of math problems, task cards, or an interactive activity that’s done online. If you’re teaching an ELA lesson, bring a reading passage, writing task, or literacy activity for students to demonstrate their understanding. Just make sure it relates back to your learning goal.

10.Personality

One of the most important elements for teacher demo lessons is to show your personality. Have fun, be yourself, and let your passion for teaching shine through!

For example: Smile, make silly jokes, make connections to your daily life, and give a glimpse of how you are as a human. Be relatable.

Here are 10 topic ideas for elementary demo lessons:

  • Determining main idea
  • Comparing fractions
  • Citing-evidence
  • Rounding numbers
  • Comparing/contrasting story elements
  • Academic vocabulary
  • Comparing decimals
  • Finding the perimeter
  • Describing characters
  • Determining author’s point of view

Here are 10 topic ideas for secondary demo lessons:

  • Annotating text
  • figurative-language
  • Grammar
  • Story structure
  • poetry analysis
  • square roots
  • Coordinating planes
  • Factoring by grouping
  • slope
  • percentages

For more new-teacher inspiration, check out the 10 Best Books for New Teachers.

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10 Elements To Include in Your Demo Lesson for Teacher Interviews